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Did You Know You Need a Ministerial Signature to Get Married Before You’re 18 in Namibia?

Not only do you need the signature from the Minister of Home Affairs and Immigration to get married if you are under 18 years of age, but if you are between the ages of 18 and 21 you need your parents or guardian to sign their consent for you to be married.   This is just one of the laws under the Married Person’s Equality Act to prevent Namibian children from forced marriage and child abuse.  For defying the law, the penalty is a fine of up to N$50,000, or imprisonment that does not exceed 10 years.

To celebrate the 25th Anniversary of the Day of the African Child, Family of Hope Services hosted a function sponsored by the European Union and Terre des Hommes Italia, with the Acting Deputy Director of the Child Welfare Division, Ms.Celeste Feris, as Guest Speaker.  Ms. Feris spoke on behalf of the Honourable Doren Siyoka, Minister of Gender Equality and Child Welfare, and identified some of the serious issues facing children in Namibia regarding child marriage.

“We have many unique identities in Namibia that define our cultures and beliefs and who we are,” said Ms. Feris.  “But not all of our cultural practices are good.  Child marriage is not good.  When a child under the age of 18 is given by her caregiver, parent or family to an older person to become his spouse, she doesn’t have a chance in life to play like the children here today. When a child gets married, and it is mostly girls given in marriage, her life changes forever.  She no longer goes to school and she can no longer contribute to the social economy.  She is often subjected to violence and abuse.  And if she gets pregnant, then she is now a child raising another child.  As many as 36% of girls as young as 12 years of age are getting pregnant. This perpetuates a vicious circle of poverty,” said Ms. Feris.

Ms. Feris noted that one of the difficulties in stopping child marriages is that the practice is hidden.  “We are taught that we should respect our elders, and so the community allows children to be promised in marriage. But these are very harmful practices and beliefs.  The Namibian government is putting laws in place under the Child Care and Protection Act to prohibit a child from being subjected to cultural practices in order to prohibit child marriages and abuse.  Combined with the Married Person’s Equality Act, there are several laws in place to protect children.  For example, it is compulsory for children to obtain an education until they are 16 years of age. If a child is under 18 years of age, the Minister of Home Affairs and Immigration must sign the consent for the child to be married.  If people don’t obey the law, we can convict them.  We encourage everyone to report these abuses,” said Feris.  She identified the fine and imprisonment terms for breaking the law.  In conclusion Ms. Feris encouraged the guests and caregivers at the event to go out and to spread the word within our communities.  “We need to SPOT IT and STOP IT,” said Ms. Feris.

The recently enacted Child Care and Protection Act, 3 of 2015(226), underlines that a person may not subject a child to social, cultural and religious practices which are detrimental to his or her well-being.

Furthermore, a person may not give a child out in marriage or engagement if such child does not consent to the marriage or engagement or is below the minimum age for marriage contemplated as in the Marriage Act as well as the Married Person’s Equality Act.

‘No boy or girl under the age of 18 years shall be capable of contracting a valid marriage except with the written permission of the Minister responsible for Home Affairs; and a person below the age of 21 years requires the consent of his or her parent/s or guardian in order to marry. A person who contravenes these subsections commits an offence and is liable on the conviction to a fine not exceeding N$50,000 or imprisonment for a period not exceeding ten years or both such fine and imprisonment.’

“We need to SPOT IT and STOP IT!” Encouragement from Ms. Celest Feris, Acting Deputy Director of the Child Welfare Division, Ministry of Gender Equality and Child Welfare, to report child marriages in Namibia.

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Acting Deputy Director of the Child Welfare Division, Ms.Celeste Feris, speaking on behalf of the Honourable Doren Siyoka, Minister of Gender Equality and Child Welfare.

The Day of the African Child is commemorated every June 16 in memory of the hundreds of unarmed children and youth who were killed in Soweto, South Africa, while protesting against their education being conducted in Afrikaans in school.  Twenty five years ago the Member States of the African Union adopted the African Children’s Charter, in memory of this tragic event.  The Charter requires member countries to collaborate on the rights of children on the continent, and to take action and demonstrate what is being done to protect the rights of children within their own countries.  The goal is to remove all obstacles to realizing child rights.  For the 25th Anniversary, the Committee adopted the theme:  Accelerating our Collective Efforts to End Child Marriage in Africa.

Ms. Abigail Bachopi, Founder and Managing Director of Family of Hope Services, addressing guests at the celebration of the Day of the African Child.

Ms. Abigail Bachopi, Founder and Managing Director of Family of Hope Services, addressing guests at the celebration of the Day of the African Child.

 

Children from Family of Hope Services' school program.

Children from Family of Hope Services’ school program.

 

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Family of Hope Services Traditional Dance group perform for guests.

Family of Hope Services Traditional Dance group perform for guests.

 

Family of Hope Services' Care Team Dancers perform for guests.

Family of Hope Services’ Care Team Dancers perform for guests.

 

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Finland is a Good Development Friend

Did you know that Finland has been present in Namibia since the 1870s?  The first Finns to arrive here were Lutheran missionaries from the Finnish Missionary Society who were assigned their first venture outside of Finland in Ovamboland in Namibia.  They established schools and health care facilities, and went on over the years to ordain many Namibian Ministers who took over the Missionary which later became known as the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Namibia.  In fact, the new Minister of Poverty Eradication and Social Welfare, the Honourable Zephania Kameeta, served many roles within the church including Vice-President, Deputy Bishop and Bishop.  The church also played a notable role in highlighting the plight of Namibians under South African rule, and in the struggle for Namibia’s independence.   Just one of the many injustices that played out during the church’s support for independence included the incarceration of Minister Kameeta in 1975.  He was detained under the Terrorism Act while addressing an NNC meeting in Katutura to protest against the Turnhalle Constitutional Conference. He was kept in darkness and solitary confinement for a fortnight.

The Honourable Zephania Kameeta, Minister of Poverty Eradication and Social Welfare, Namibia

The Honourable Zephania Kameeta, Minister of Poverty Eradication and Social Welfare, Namibia

In 1990, when independence was finally won, Finland was one of the first countries with whom Namibia established diplomatic relations.  Namibia also became one of Finland’s main partner countries in the field of development cooperation. Between 1991 and 2003 alone, Finland invested more than 74 million euros in financing in Namibia.  And their investment continues to date with their Fund for Local Cooperation that is directed towards the development of civil society, democracy and human rights, and the support for culture.

Given the extensive work that Finland undertakes in Namibia, we were thrilled, to say the least, when we were visited on Friday, June 5th, by three officials from the Embassy of Finland:  Mrs. Elisabet Kivimäki, Deputy Head of Mission, Mrs. Marika Matengu, Programme Coordinator, and  Ms. Niina Lääperi, FLC Coordination Assistant.  Our visitors took a tour of Family of Hope Services’ new centre in Havana, Katutura and we were able to showcase some of the programmes that we offer.

Left to right: Foibe Silvanus, Community Development Officer, Family of Hope Services; Marika Matengu, Programme Coordinator Embassy of Finland; Abigail Bachopi, Managing Director, Family of Hope Services; and Khonzani Tizora, IT and Computers, Family of Hope Services

Left to right: Foibe Silvanus, Community Development Officer, Family of Hope Services; Marika Matengu,
Programme Coordinator, Embassy of Finland; Abigail Bachopi, Managing Director, Family of Hope Services; and Khonzani Tizora, IT and Computers, Family of Hope Services

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Left to right: Elisabet Kivimäki, Deputy Head of Mission, Embassy of Finland; and Niina Lääperi, FLC Coordination Assistant, Embassy of Finland.

Looking inside the counseling room where children undergo play therapy, one-on-one and group counseling, and peer group discussions.

Looking inside the counseling room where children undergo play therapy, one-on-one and group counseling, and peer group discussions.

Sneaking a taste of Fatcake, made by our cooks for the community leaders on site who were in training for child protection.

Sneaking a taste of Fatcake, made by our cooks for the community leaders on site who were in training for child protection.

 

 

Nos invités spéciaux de France

Nous adorons avoir des visiteurs. Cela permet à notre groupe culturel de montrer leurs danses, et nous donne la possibilité d’informer les gens sur les conditions de vie de beaucoup d’enfants à Katutura. C’est pourquoi nous étions si contents et reconnaissants, lorsque Matiti Safaris, grand opérateur de voyage très connu a amené quelques uns de ses voyageurs dans notre nouveau centre hier. Nous avons passé un bon moment et apprécié que ces gens aient pris le temps de venir à notre rencontre. Ils ont même apporté des cadeaux ! Nous avons vraiment apprécié le geste ! Comme chaque personne familière à Family of Hope Services le sait, nos enfants ont constamment besoin de vêtements, fournitures scolaires et nourriture. Un grand merci aux guides, Alex et Blandine, ainsi qu’à Lucie de chez Matiti vous avoir rendu cette visite possible.

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La visite a commencé avec le chant de bienvenue des enfants, puis la danse de notre groupe culturel. Abigail Bachopi, fondatrice et directrice, a ensuite expliqué notre objectif qui est d’aider à sortir les enfants du cycle de pauvreté. Blandine, superbe guide de Matiti Safaris s’est chargée de la traduction pour nos invités.

 

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Nos invités ont chanté “Frère Jacques” aux enfants.

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Si vous êtes intéressé(s) pour venir visiter Family of Hope Services, nous accueillons les visiteurs dans notre centre le mercredi et vendredi après-midi de 14:30 à 15:30.

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Si vous avez prévu un séjour en Namibie, nous vous recommandons Matiti Safaris : www.matitisafaris.com. Il s’agit d’une société bien établie en Namibie qui se charge d’organiser tout ce que vous voulez y voir et faire. Ils proposent des visites en groupe organisées ainsi que des safaris personnalisés. Rendez vous sur leur page Facebook et cliquez sur la mention “j’aime” pour pouvoir suivre leurs dernières actualités.

 

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Our Special Guests From France

We love visitors.  It gives our cultural group the chance to show off their dancing skills, and it enables us to teach people about the living situations of so many children in Katutura.  So, when Matiti Safaris, a large and well-known Namibian tour operator, brought some of their guests to our new Centre yesterday, we were excited and grateful.   We had a good visit and appreciate that these people made time to come to meet us.  And they brought gifts!  This is so very thoughtful!   As everyone familiar with Family of Hope Services knows, our children always need clothing, school supplies, and food.  A big thank you to the guides, Alex and Blandine, and to Lucie in Matiti’s office for making the visit possible.

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The visit started out with the children singing the ‘welcome’ song, and then our cultural group danced.  Then Abigail Bachopi, our founder and Managing Director, explained what we do help children get out of the cycle of poverty.  Blandine, the beautiful tour guide with Matiti Safaris, translated for our guests.

 

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Our guests sang Frère Jacques for the children.

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For anyone interested in visiting Family of Hope Services we welcome guests on Wednesday and Friday afternoons from 14:30 to 15:30.

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If you are planning a visit to Namibia, we can highly recommend Matiti Safaris – www.matitisafaris.com.  They are a well-established Namibian company who can organize anything you desire to do and see in Namibia.  They have established group departures and they do tailor-made safaris as well.  Go to their Facebook page and ‘like’ it so that you can keep up with their latest developments.

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Pupkewitz MegaTech Donates to the Children

Candy and her team

Candy Muller and her colleagues from Pupkewitz MegaTech delivered a very nice surprise to all of us at Family of Hope Services. We had no idea we would be the recipients of their internal fund-raising activities so when Candy arranged a visit to hand over their cheque for N$12,400, we couldn’t be more ecstatically surprised!

“The staff members who joined me yesterday were extremely moved by the work that Abigail and her colleagues are doing,” said Candy who handles Sales & Marketing for Pupkewitz MegaTech. “Our Managing Director and his family, Paul and Betsy Koster, have supported Family of Hope Services in the past in their personal capacity… so FHS is no stranger to some within our company. As part of our initiative to give back, we did an internal survey where the staff members could choose who they want to support in terms of Social Responsibility. All voted to help children. So we researched various institutions and in the end we nominated Family of Hope Services to receive our donation”.

As Namibians know, Pupkewitz is a national business icon in operation since 1925 and the company has a long history of contributing to the community. So we are feeling blessed that they chose us this year. The money was raised at a customer auction, and MegaTech matched the amount.

“This is such a welcome surprise,” said Abigail Bachopi, Director at Family of Hope Services.  “We are always in need of support but this donation is doubly appreciated today because it will help us to recover some of our losses in the theft we had at the Centre a couple of weeks ago. We’ll be able to replace the stolen food for our feeding program, stolen school uniforms and supplies, and to pay for the fixing of the doors and locks,” said Abigail.

The donation from Pupkewitz MegaTech couldn’t have come at a better time.  From all of the kids and volunteers at Family of Hope Services, thank you, Pupkewitz MegaTech!!!!!

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Laurelton Reign Diamonds Donates N$200,000

Family of Hope Services is very fortunate to have such a generous and consistent donor!  Thank you Laurelton Reign Diamonds!

Laurelton Reign Diamonds donates to Family of Hope Services for the third time!

This well-established diamond manufacturing company, with their factory in Katutura, Namibia, is a subsidiary of Tiffany & Co. which is one of the oldest and most prestigious jewelers in the world.  In February, 2015, they handed over a cheque for N$200,000 ($20,000 US) to Family of Hope Services, a registered welfare organization that educates and feeds orphans and vulnerable children in Katutura.

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Abigail Bachopi, Director of Family of Hope Services, accepting a cheque from Luc De Smet, Vice President Manufacturing, Africa, for Laurelton Diamonds

“We are so grateful for Laurelton’s faith in us and for their continued support”, says Abigail Bachopi, Founder and Director of Family of Hope Services.  “Without your donations we could not have built our new centre in Havana and continue to educate and feed so many disadvantaged children.  We want to thank you from the community at large and in particular on behalf of the children at FHS who benefit directly.”

This third donation from Laurelton Reign Diamonds will be used for Family of Hope Services’ solar project.  The long-term goal of Family of Hope Services – the ‘Little Charity That Could’ – is to become self-sufficient.  The solar project will not only allow them to function primarily off-grid, but it will allow them to rent re-chargeable batteries to people within the community to use for lighting at night and to charge their cell phones.

Laurelton’s two previous donations of N$250,000 ($35,000 US) made it possible for Family of Hope Services to build the new Centre in Havana, Katutura.  The money was used to clear and fence the land, and to build two additional classrooms by connecting four stacked container units with brick rooms.  Family of Hope Services was also able to build a kitchen and can now support 500 children at their new location.

Left to right: Mike Bergkoetter, Vice President of Supply Chain and Operations, Tiffany & Co., and Andy Hart,  Senior Vice President, Diamonds and Gemstones with Tiffany & Co. and President of their subsidiary, Laurelton Diamonds, on tour of the new centre with Abigail Bachopi, Director of Family of Hope Services.

Left to right: Mike Bergkoetter, Vice President of Supply Chain and Operations, Tiffany & Co., and Andy Hart, Senior Vice President, Diamonds and Gemstones with Tiffany & Co. and President of their subsidiary, Laurelton Diamonds, on tour of the new centre with Abigail Bachopi, Director of Family of Hope Services.

At the small ceremony that was coordinated at the Laurelton Reign Diamonds factory to hand over the cheque, Johan Du Preez, Plant Director, talked about how the company believes in giving back to the community in which they do business and about the good long-term relationship established with Family of Hope Services.

In addition to the large cheques that Laurelton Reign Diamonds has handed over to Family of Hope Services over the years, they also donate food on a weekly basis, they donated interlocks for the new centre, and the management staff sponsor a child.

Luc De Smet, the Vice President of Manufacturing for Africa, and his wife, Danette Jaeb, also donate all of the marketing materials for the charity and sponsor a number of children.

Johan Du Preez and his wife, Christine Du Preez, donate clothing to the centre.

Siobhan Zollner, Manager – Executive Administration for Tiffany & Co., organizes and sends boxes of clothing and school supplies to the centre every year, and a number of Tiffany & Co. staff and board members also support through sponsorship and donations.

For more information contact:  Abigail Bachopi – Director@familyofhopeservices.org

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Johan DuPreez, Plant Director, Laurelton Reign Diamonds.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Laurelton Reign staff and Family of Hope Services staff, celebrating the donation.

Laurelton Reign staff and Family of Hope Services staff, celebrating the donation.

Fran Ndroma, Director on the Board of Laurelton Reign Diamonds, greets Abigail Bachopi, Director at Family of Hope Services.  Luc De Smet, Vice President Manufacturing, Africa, looks on.

Fran Ndroma, Director on the Board of Laurelton Reign Diamonds, greets Abigail Bachopi, Director at Family of Hope Services. Luc De Smet, Vice President Manufacturing, Africa, looks on.

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Guest enjoying a delicious buffet.

 

 

When There’s No One to Take the Children

Maria Snyders

Ouma Maria Snyders

I had to bow my head during my interview with 71-year-old Ouma (Grandma) Maria Snyders so that her grandchildren could not see the tears in my eyes.  I understand enough Afrikaans to know that she was telling me that she has cancer in both of her breasts and in one ovary and that she needs to have a double mastectomy and the ovarian cancer removed.  What her daughter-in-law had to translate, that I didn’t catch, was that Maria isn’t going for the operation because there is no one to look after the children.

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Ouma Maria Snyders surrounded by a few of her grandchildren.

Ouma Maria takes care of 25 kids on her meager pension.  These are her grandchildren who’ve been abandoned by Maria’s own nine children, some of whom have died, and others who are addicts sitting around in shebeens (bars) and drowning out their sorrows either with alcohol or drugs.  It is not possible for me to ask the many questions that I want to ask because my translator into Oshiwambo is young and on her first assignment with me and has not been taught about privacy and a show of respect, and everything needs to be translated a second time into Afrikaans by Maria’s daughter-in-law.  Plus I am being swarmed by all of the little children touching my camera and photo bombing just like kids everywhere in the world, and I don’t want them to understand what we are discussing unless it is general.  In the first place, I’m really not visiting Maria for Maria’s story.  I’m here to learn about her grandson, Rolandino, so that we can find someone to sponsor him for school.  But, it is Maria I am most interested in.  She radiates the depth of a good soul and I’m sure she has had many fascinating experiences in her life.

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Ouma Maria Snyders with her grandson, Rolandino.

What I do learn is that Maria is coloured with Damara in her background.  She was born in the Old Location in Windhoek and she and her husband moved to the resettlement area, known as Katutura, without a lot of trouble.   Coloured and all Namibian tribes were forcefully moved from the Old Location to Katutura at the end of the 1950s, where they were segregated by tribe.  Maria worked as a housekeeper for many years.  She said she had a good life.

Maria Snyders

Ouma Maria Snyders

Despite her beautiful smile, I detect worry in Maria’s eyes.   All the little children surrounding her are clearly cared about and nourished to the best of Maria’s ability.  But, what will happen to them when she goes for surgery?

  • Maria’s pension is N$700 a month which is equivalent to $48 USD, and €43 per month.
  • Food prices are high in Namibia and trying to feed and clothe all of these children on so little money is impossible. To give you an example, my monthly utility bill in Windhoek, the same city as Maria, is twice Maria’s income.
  • Maria must also pay for water, approximately N$113; $8 USD; €7 per month. (Rolandino goes to collect from the public taps not too far from their okambashu.)
  • She must pay a lease amount of about N$70 ($5 USD; €4) for the land where her okambashu sits.
  • She has to pay school fees and buy uniforms for all of the children going to school (it amounts to approximately N$150; $10 USD; €9 per month per child in secondary school) plus she must buy clothes and warm blankets for the cold winter months we are experiencing right now.

I know that three of her grandchildren are sponsored for school by Family of Hope Services but there are so many others that I don’t how Maria manages.  She does have some financial support from one tall young man, her grandson, Mario.  Mario is 14-years-old and a school drop-out because he needs to work.  He has a job, cleaning, every Tuesday in Pioneer’s Park, a suburb of the capital city of Windhoek.  Mario’s financial contribution to the household provides a small supplement to Maria’s meager pension.

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14-year-old Mario.

Maria also has some support from her sister-in-law who lives out of town.  Her sister-in-law, who is in her 50’s, comes to Windhoek to help out with the children from Monday to Friday.  She brings a bit of firewood so that Maria can cook for the kids.  On the weekends, however, she must return to her husband who works on a farm 100km from Windhoek.  Maria’s sister-in-law can only help with the children during the week.  Considering Maria’s options with her health, this is not enough to remove the burden of worry she feels.  If Maria goes for surgery the doctors have told her that she’ll need at least two months to recover and, at her age, there is no guarantee of survival.  So Maria continues to postpone going to the hospital.   If Maria doesn’t survive her cancer or the surgery to remove her cancer, the burden of care for the children will fall to the oldest grandchild who is a young woman of 18.  Without Maria to collect her pension, how would such a young girl feed and care for all of the kids?

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Ouma Maria showing where she cooks the meals for her grandchildren.

 

Inside Ouma Maria's okambashu.

Inside Ouma Maria’s okambashu.

There is only one bedroom in the okambashu.

There is only one bedroom in the okambashu.  Three children sleep with Ouma Maria in her bed, the others share the second bed and the floor.  The older children sleep in the other okambashu and Rolandino sleeps at his father’s house but spends the days with Ouma Maria.

Whatever the reasons why Ouma Maria’s own children have gone astray, the little grandchildren are victims of the situation and it is only through organizations like Family of Hope Services that they are introduced to a world where they learn to care for themselves, where they get an education, and where they can see prospects for their futures.   Family of Hope Services employs many programs to build self-esteem and confidence in children, including providing counseling via partners for more than 60% of the children they support.  Without outside help, Maria’s grandchildren will most likely follow in the footsteps of their parents.

 

Sponsor Rolandino

Celebrating the Day of the African Child

“Namibia is one of the highest investors in education and for that we thank you Namibian Government, for the free pre-primary education and for plans to make secondary education free.  It is not the same all over Africa as young children in Nigeria, Malawi and Somalia are being robbed of their education through early marriages and sexual assault and other factors.”

These were the words of 15-year-old Iyaloo as she read a short speech at the Day of the African Child hosted by Family of Hope Services on their new site in Havana, Katutura.  The Day of the African Child is held in memory of the more than 500 learners who lost their lives in the 1976 Soweto revolution in South African.  The day is intended to celebrate the recognition of the human rights of children.

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Fifteen-year-old Iyaloo, reading her speech before children attending Namibian Child Day in Havana, Katutura.

 

Hundreds of children showed up at the site and took part in the celebrations.  There was dancing, poetry, Iyaloo’s speech, and a drama presentation.  Students from the Namibian College of Arts attended as well and took photos of the event.  One of their colleagues, Norman Job, worked for weeks with Family of Hope’s drama club to perform two plays he wrote and directed:  1.  Entangled Conspiracy — a story involving a pastor, traditional healer and police officer that shows the corrupt practices and the abuse of power and position by individuals within our society; and 2. There’s No Sugar — a story about a young boy who cannot read and write at the age of 8 and how he survives with an alcoholic father, an abused mother, and a bully for a sister.  The play exposes the social issues often at play in Namibia.

The event was a great success.  “There are so many kids here.  We never expected such a high turnout,” says Abigail Bachopi, Director of Family of Hope Services.  “It’s rewarding to see the schools and community showing such support and collaboration in recognizing that we need to protect the rights of our children.”

The event was funded by Terres des Hommes out of Italy and Family of Hope Services.  It is all part of promoting human rights in the community under the initiative which Family of Hope has been delivering in the community for two years.

But there is still a long way to go before vulnerable children in Namibia are enjoying the benefits of those who have money in Namibia and of the majority of children in the western world.

While Iyaloo thanked the Namibian Government for what they are doing for children so far, Iyaloo herself is a victim of circumstance and one of thousands of children whose guardians cannot afford to send them to school.  In her speech she goes on to point out that,

“Even though we have free education in the younger grades, as children we feel that it’s not enough to have free education, but that other issues should be addressed as well.  What is the point of having free education if pupils don’t have transport to school or they go to school hungry?  It is vital that these issues are addressed.”

Iyaloo is one of the children on a waiting list for sponsorship for school at Family of Hope Services.  She is fortunate that she can come to the Family of Hope Centre for tutoring but Iyaloo is unable to write her exams without a sponsor.

Norman Job, script writer and director of two dramas performed by Family of Hope's youth at the Namibian Child Day.

Norman Job, script writer and director of two dramas performed by Family of Hope’s youth at the Day of the African Child.

Kids celebrating their human rights.

Kids celebrating their human rights.

 

Children from Pastor Gaingob's home.  He and his wife have taken in 16 children who were living on the street.  You can see that some of these children still do not have shoes.  It is a struggle all around.

Children from Pastor Gaingob’s home. He and his wife have taken in 16 children who were living on the street. You can see that some of these children still do not have shoes. It is a struggle all around.

 

A Family of Hope child, celebrating.

A Family of Hope child, celebrating.

 

The crowd.

The crowd.

 

Family of Hope dancers.

Family of Hope dancers.

 

Family of Hope youth leader, Anna Kayiwa, acted as one of the hosts.

Family of Hope youth leader, Anna Kayiwa, acted as one of the hosts.

 

Another youth leader, Mathew Daniel.

Another youth leader, Matthew Shilamba.

 

Children from Moses Garoeb school, reciting a poem.

Children from A.K. Katangolo Pre-primary school, reciting a poem.

 

Namibian College of Arts students from left to right:  Amutenya Kaija, Maggy Kauraere, Abigail Bachopi (Director, Family of Hope), Helean Litula, Haimbanga Imanuael, Terry Liang (local entrepreneur who came to assess Family of Hope's site to make it self-sustainable), and Sylvia Daisy Gawaseb.  Two of Family of Hope's children are standing in front.

Namibian College of Arts students from left to right: Amutenya Kaija, Maggy Kauraere, Abigail Bachopi (Director, Family of Hope), Helean Litula, Haimbanga Imanuael, Terry Liang (local entrepreneur who came to assess Family of Hope’s site to make it self-sustainable), and Sylvia Daisy Gawaseb. Two of Family of Hope’s children are standing in front.

 

 

The two primary event coordinators, Foibe Silvanus, Family of Hope's Community Development Officer, and Ana Paulo, Family of Hope's Director of Education.

The two primary event coordinators, Foibe Silvanus, Family of Hope’s Community Development Officer, and Ana Paulo, Family of Hope’s Director of Education.

If you want to sponsor Iyaloo or any of the other children on our waiting list, please do here:

Sponsor Iyaloo